Wednesday, November 13, 2013

In Season Videos Week 1

In Season Videos Week 1

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Block/Charge (Secondary Defender): During this example, the secondary defender (#11 white jersey) is able to establish a legal guarding position outside of the restricted area and in the path of the offensive player prior to the offensive player leaving the floor.  The end line replay gives great perspective from the lead position.

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Dead Ball Officiating: Following the whistle for a common foul, notice the actions of the two defensive players (#25 white jersey) & (#10 white jersey).  The penalty and administration should be addressed immediately by the crew. This is an example of a need for team officiating during a dead ball period.
 
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Game Management: Use this example to discuss game management and maintaining a high level of concentration throughout the entire game. Following a made free-throw and substitution, notice the 6 offensive players (red jerseys). It is important to make eye contact with your partners prior to putting the ball in play during these types of scenarios. This is a team officiating play, with shared responsibility from all 3 officials on the floor. In the words of one of my mentors, if your crew allows 6 on the floor, the entire city of Tyler and surrounding areas will know within 30 minutes of the game ending that your crew let 6 on the floor. Not a good conversation. Just slow everything down, count all players, and communicate.

JY

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Pre Season Videos Week 2

Here are some additional videos for your review:

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Team Officiating (Out of Bounds): This demonstrates the correct fundamental when we are unsure of an out of bounds play. The lead official simply raises his hand looking at the center official for help. Without hesitation the center official gives a signal using snap and command.


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Team Officiating (Out of Bounds): Like the previous play, this is a correct fundamental by the crew involving help on out of bounds plays.

Jason

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Pre-Season Videos

Here are some videos for your review:

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1.  Trail Position: In this example the trail official moves towards an initial starting position inside the 28 foot line, thus allowing the trail to stay engaged to the play as it develops at the rim.

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2. Block/Charge: In this example, what do you think of the call?  Regardless of the actual call, notice how wide Lead gets to get the best look at this play. Really nice.

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3. Rebounding Action: In this example, the illegal action on the backside by the offensive rebounder (#10 black jersey) forces the ball to become loose momentarily, thus a rebounding foul is correct. Continue to stay connected to these types of plays from the trail position, being ready to assist with a big picture mentality on all rebounding action. In addition, look at the trail position at the time the ball is shot and rebounding begins. Trail has to stay engaged throughout the play.

Look forward to seeing you all this Wednesday for our first chapter meeting!

JY

Monday, January 21, 2013

DO YOU KNOW YOUR ABSOLUTES?

TABO Members - I have updated the Absolutes, and they are a great way to simplify and remember rules and scenarios.  Review these please so you can serve well the games you are calling, as they continue to increase in intensity and importance to the post-season.  Keep learning...



NFHS REFEREEING ABSOLUTES

* Offensive Fouls (i.e. push in the back, push off, illegal screen) - we only shoot 1-1/bonus any more on an Offensive foul during a jump ball (rare) or during a SHOT ATTEMPT. There is no Team Control on a jump ball, or after the ball has left the shooter’s hand.  Throw-in now = Team Control, no 1-1, and ball at spot of foul.

* Technical Fouls (on player, coach, admin./book errors) - always count towards Team Fouls, and therefore the Bonus.  Ensure the Table counts it as such...

* Intentional Foulsalways carry 2 Free Throws (with no one in the lane) & the ball at the spot of the foul for the offended team (Exception:  Missed 3 point attempt = 3 free throws & the ball).  So, made 2 or 3 pt shot with Int'l Foul = 2 shot + Ball.

* Fouls are always administered in the order that they occur in HS.

* Backcourt – We can never have a Backcourt Violation on an initial throw-in (throw-in exception). Mid-court line “disappears” on a throw-in, until the ball is touched.  Also, we can never have a backcourt on a back tap into the backcourt by a player from a shot.

* Time-Outs – can only be called when the ball is dead, or the ball is in player control by the team calling the time out (loose ball = no time out).  Once a timeout is granted, even if done in error, it HAS to be given.

* Fighting – Those players causing a fight (i.e. taunting), participating in a fight, or leaving the bench area (whether or not they participate) are always FLAGRANT acts = EJECTION. All ejections count towards Team Foul Total.  An attempt to hit another player IS also a fight = EJECTION.  Please review Rule 10-6  Penalties #8 - "Fighting".

* 2 Hands – on an opponent is always a foul.

* Violations – by the offense always cause the arrow to be lost on an Alt. Possession Throw-In. A foul does not cause the Arrow to be lost.

* Coaches – Respond only to QUESTIONS, and acknowledge comments as necessary (i.e. Nod head, etc). You can’t misquote silence, but remember to not ignore coaches...Easy saying, “I’ll watch it Coach

Friday, January 18, 2013

RESPECT FOR THE GAME

TABO Members - As district play heats up and the post-season is on the horizon, I thought I would re-visit a good video tool we promoted a few years back to help us with Respect for the Game scenarios, Respect for the Officials, and Technical Fouls.  While the goal is always to use communication techniques and warnings to prevent a technical foul (AC: "A technical foul is a tool, not a weapon"), the scenarios as you will see below demand a technical foul.

These 8-10 video clips give an excellent example of what violates certain respect principles universally and what can be applied to our game, since the HFHS and NCAA do not always give as clear a picture as the NBA does in this area. 

Please review and enjoy and check out the other areas of the "Video Rule Book" - Flagrant Fouls, Post Play, Block/Charge, etc - keeping in mind there may be slight variations to their rules and our rules:


                      http://www.nba.com/videorulebook/category.html?cid=91


Keep working hard to get better, and keep being open to feedback and improvement.

All the Best,
Deke

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

BLOCK / CHARGE TEST - HOW GOOD ARE YOU?

TABO Members - For those of you who did not see these clips or the answers below, here they are to go over.  It is no doubt one of the hardest calls in basketball and why we should spend a lot of time watching B/C plays and learning from video examples, as well as calls on the floor. 

The NFHS website also has some good video resources on this topic and others (http://nfhs-basketball.arbitersports.com/front/105407/Video).  Good luck on the "test" - NCAA Coordinator of Men's Officials John Adams' answers follow.  Please click on the link below:


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-basketball/news/20121214/hoop-thoughts/?sct=uk_t11_a8




Seth Davis Asks: Block Or Charge - Answers by John Adams

 

Play One Answer: BLOCK

"Once the dribbler left the ground to pass or shoot, the only thing that defender could have done was turn to protect himself. He cannot move. On this play, the dribbler leaves the ground and the defender slides to his left to force contact, and he erroneously draws a charge."

 

Play Two Answer: CHARGE

"The defender is not doing one thing wrong. He establishes legal guarding position and he moves backwards to maintain it. In this situation, where the dribbler does not leave his feet, the defender is allowed to move laterally or away from the guy he's guarding. He just can't move up and into him. He has both feet on the floor and he's facing the dribbler, and he gets run over for his trouble."

 

Play Three Answer: CHARGE

"Again, Gutierrez did nothing wrong. He's a legal defender who gets run over. The fact that he's moving has nothing to do with it. He establishes position and then moves legally to maintain it. He has an imaginary semi-circle around him to work with, as long as he does move into the dribbler."

 

Play Four Answer: CHARGE

"Crowder is moving legally to maintain guarding position. The guy hits him dead square in the chest and knocks him to the ground."

 

Play Five Answer: CHARGE

"It's almost the exact same play. The Harvard kid establishes legal guarding position and moves legally to maintain it. It does not matter that he's still moving at the point of contact."

 

Play Six Answer: CHARGE

"My teaching point here was that when a defender is close to that restricted area arc, we want to get a good look at him and make sure he wasn't inside it. The dribbler left his feet, so there is higher threshold here. The defender has to freeze except to protect himself from a collision."

 

Play Seven Answer: BLOCK

"This is exactly what you can't do. The Kansas player moved up and into the player he was guarding and created the contact. If he had just stood there, it would have been an easy charge call."

 

Play Eight Answer: BLOCK

"The defender moved after the Syracuse player left the floor. He only slides a foot or two, but it's enough."

 

Play Nine Answer: BLOCK

"The defender illegally moves up and absorbs contact. What's interesting there is that on an offensive rebound, the defender that's guarding the man with the ball automatically becomes the primary defender. So he can take a charge even if he's inside the circle. He may have been the secondary defender when the first shot was released, but once there is an offensive rebound, the play resets."

 

Play 10 Answer: BLOCK

"Dieng clearly moves after Kidd-Gilchrist leaves the floor. You only see that from the overhead replay, which is why this is such a tough call. At the point Kidd-Gilchrist leaves his feet, Dieng is supposed to be frozen
 
 
 
Keep growing, accepting feedback and giving feedback - as a wise man once said, "Feedback is the breakfast of champions."
 
Best Regards,
Deke

Monday, December 17, 2012

INTENSITY ON THE RISE

TABO Members - District play is in full swing with many schools, or getting ready to ramp up, and therefore intensity will be on the rise.  Continue to study the Case Book, Rule 4, and any areas you feel weak in (correctable errors, a fight situation - would you know what to do?).  "Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Performance" and embarrassment.  Here are a few thoughts and a few clips to enjoy:

1.  Coach/Player Behavior - As intensity increases, be sure to correct inappropriate behavior EARLY by addressing it with problem players, coaches, etc.  A warning in the 1st quarter can go a long way to set the tone early and get the game and everyone back on track.  Remember AC's wisdom, "A technical foul is a tool, not a weapon."  Hopefully not needed but if a coach or player disrepects the game and/or the crew, a technical foul may be the best option. 

2.  Know Roles - If an asst coach is making comments, ask the Head Coach to politely handle the asst - that is their job.   Likewise, we do not confront fans - that is the role of the Game Administrator.  If a player is making subtle comments after calls, ask the Head Coach or the Captain to take care of it ("Coach, #12 is making comments after each call.  Can you help us with that before he/she gets a Technical Foul?").  If he/she refuses to help, or the player disrespects the crew, a technical foul is a tool to help the game.

3.  "On Dead Balls...that is when we come ALIVE" - Heard this excellent quote during a conference call tonight.  Be MORE on guard when the whistle blows for dead ball contact, gestures, and taunting.  Remember, a fight is like success - it doesn't just break out spontaneously.

4.  Block/Charge Clips - Thanks to Jason Yearty for these clips.  If you all see any links worthy, please send them.  Read Seth Davis's explanation - i.e. defender can be moving on a Block/Charge on a dribble, but on airborne shooter, they must be set before leaving the floor. Be sure to also see John Adam's answer's on Page 2 of the article for correct answers. Be sure to Watch the Defense:

     http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-basketball/news/20121214/hoop-thoughts/?sct=uk_t11_a8

Remember, our job as a crew is to get plays right.  So, be sure to pre-game if a mistake is made and how to correct it (get together, talk about it while watching players, and serve the game by dropping egos and getting it RIGHT).  If there is confusion, I like Tim Banks quote - "Better to spend 15 seconds on the court to get it right, than to spend 15 minutes in the locker room on how we messed it up."  Our integrity demands that...

Keep up the good work TABO, keep hustling to get the best angles, and keep improving.  We are doing many things well and need to keep working hard.  And with what has tragically occurred in CT recently, be sure to hug your kids and loved ones a little more this week, and let them how you feel about them. 

Merry Christmas,
Deke